DRUG ATTITUDE INVENTORY (DAI-10)

Name
(please print)
 
Date  

The aim of this questionnaire is to gain some understanding of what people think about medications and what experiences people have of them. Your answers will be used for research purposes only, are strictly confidential and will in no way affect your treatment.

How to fill in this questionnaire;-

  1. Read each statement and decide whether it is true as applied to you or false as applied to you.
  2. If a statement is TRUE or MOSTLY TRUE to you, circle the T at the end of the line.
  3. If a statement is FALSE or MOSTLY FALSE to you, circle the F at the end of the line.
  4. If you want to change an answer, mark an X over the incorrect answer and circle the correct answer
  5. If a statement is not worded quite the way you would put it, please decide whether the answer is mostly true or mostly false to you.

There are no right or wrong answers. Please give YOUR OWN OPINION, not what you think we might want to hear.

MEDICATION QUESTIONNAIRE

Your name;-

Date;-

1.

For me, the good things about medication outweigh the bad

T F

2.

I feel strange, "doped up", on medication

T F

3.

I take medications of my own free choice

T F

4.

Medications make me feel more relaxed

T F

5.

Medication makes me feel tired and sluggish

T F

6.

I take medication only when I feel ill

T F

7.

I feel more normal on medication

T F

8.

It is unnatural for my mind and body to be controlled by medications

T F

9.

My thoughts are clearer on medication

T F

10.

Taking medication will prevent me from having a breakdown

T F

If you have any further comments about medication or this questionnaire, please write them below:

PS   NS   TS  

SCORING

Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-30)

Adapted from "A self-report scale predictive of drug compliance in schizophrenics: reliability and discriminative validity", Hogan TP, Awad AG, Eastwood R, Psychological Medicine 1983, 13, 177-183.

The scale short has 6 items that will be scored as True and 4 scored as False if the person is fully compliant (positive subjective response).

"Positive" answers will be as follows and score as plus one:

  1. T
  2. F
  3. T
  4. T
  5. F
  6. F
  7. T
  8. F
  9. T
  10. T

"Negative" answers score as minus one

e.g. a circle round the above letters counts as plus one (e.g. a circle or tick on the F of question one will score plus one, a circle or tick on the T of question one will score minus one).

The final score for each person at each time is the positive score minus the negative score.

A positive total final score means a positive subjective response (compliant). A negative total score means a negative subjective response (non-compliant).

Some further information from Daniel Dugan, which I've adapted from a Psychpharm Discussion List message:

The DAI-10 is derived from stepwise discriminant analyses of responses of 150 schizophrenic patients to the DAI-30. In the preliminary validation reported, these coefficients were used as weights applied to the score of the corresponding item in the shortened version (DAI-10).

The scale has 10 items, 6 of which would be endorsed as TRUE and 4 as false in a non-dysphoric or compliant profile. A 'compliant' response is scored as +1; a dysphoric response is scored as -1. A positive sum of items indicates a positive subjective response (SR); a negative sum of scores indicates a negative SR (non-compliant). [NOTE: this work was done with patients receiving first generation neuroleptics.]

Below is our standard of a completely compliant response profile (positive SR),i.e., all items scored +1:

1 (T) 2 (F) 3 (T) 4 (T) 5 (F) 6 (F) 7 (T) 8 (F) 9 (T) 10 (T)
As for the perceived ambiguity of item 8, I thinks its wording is entirely unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, among some 100 items in the earliest item pool, it always emerged as having robust discriminative ability. Perhaps this is diminished in American English (though in linguistic validation studies conducted by MAPI Research involving most European languages; and American, Australian and Canadian English, I believe the original wording was maintained in the last three (I don't have that material at hand at the moment). If it works, it works and one should be dissuaded from fixing what ain't broken.

Daniel J. Dugan, Pharm.D., BCPP
Clinical Sciences Fellow
The University of Texas at Austin and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio